petticoatguru:

Caraco, early 18th centuryCroatia, ŠibenikBizarre silk in greyish-blue damask; gilded lace with zigzag patterned floral motif.
Dress, c. 1710.Croatia, Blato na KorčuliBrocaded Lyon silk damask. An exceptionally rich and expensive example of bizarre silk design.
Museum of Arts and Crafts, Croatia

petticoatguru:

Caraco, early 18th century
Croatia, Šibenik
Bizarre silk in greyish-blue damask; gilded lace with zigzag patterned floral motif.

Dress, c. 1710.
Croatia, Blato na Korčuli
Brocaded Lyon silk damask. An exceptionally rich and expensive example of bizarre silk design.

Museum of Arts and Crafts, Croatia

missfolly:

The Three Witches from Shakespeare’s Macbeth, by Daniel Gardner, 1775
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire and Elizabeth Lamb, Viscountess Melbourne – the most famous political hostesses and society beauties of their day – are shown gathered around the witches’ cauldron alongside their friend, the sculptor Anne Seymour Damer. © National Portrait Gallery, London

missfolly:

The Three Witches from Shakespeare’s Macbeth, by Daniel Gardner, 1775

Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire and Elizabeth Lamb, Viscountess Melbourne – the most famous political hostesses and society beauties of their day – are shown gathered around the witches’ cauldron alongside their friend, the sculptor Anne Seymour Damer. © National Portrait Gallery, London

oldrags:

Robe à la française, ca 1760 England, KCI
Chinese-inspired (chinoiserie) arts were popular in the 17th-18th centuries as traders brought back exotic goods from the far east.  In fashion and textiles, this is usually manifested through prints or construction.  Here, it comes in the form of color.  Yellow in traditional Chinese culture belonged to the ruling family alone and could not be used in any way by anyone belonging to a lower rank of society.  The emperor was even known as Huangdi (“Yellow Emperor”).  This knowledge led to a surge in popularity of the color in Europe.

oldrags:

Robe à la française, ca 1760 England, KCI

Chinese-inspired (chinoiserie) arts were popular in the 17th-18th centuries as traders brought back exotic goods from the far east.  In fashion and textiles, this is usually manifested through prints or construction.  Here, it comes in the form of color.  Yellow in traditional Chinese culture belonged to the ruling family alone and could not be used in any way by anyone belonging to a lower rank of society.  The emperor was even known as Huangdi (“Yellow Emperor”).  This knowledge led to a surge in popularity of the color in Europe.

beyondthegoblincity:

Portrait of Sarah Cook by Carl Ludwig Christinec, 1775

beyondthegoblincity:

Portrait of Sarah Cook by Carl Ludwig Christinec, 1775

necspenecmetu:

Jacuqes-Louis David, The Love of Helen and Paris (detail), 1788

necspenecmetu:

Jacuqes-Louis David, The Love of Helen and Paris (detail), 1788

ornamentedbeing:

last third 18th century

oldrags:

Robe à l’anglaise, ca 1785 England, KCI

oldrags:

Robe à l’anglaise, ca 1785 England, KCI


La Cible D’Amour (detail)
Francois Boucher
1758

La Cible D’Amour (detail)

Francois Boucher

1758

The Doctor visits 18th century France! It’s the his favorite period in the history of Earth. This is the final story of the first series of Doctor Who.

thusitakemyleaveoftheworld:

Thomas Gainsborough’s works:

  1. The Linley Sisters (1772)
  2. Gainsborough’s Daughter Mary (1777)
  3. Two Daughters with a Cat (c. 1759)
  4. The Artist’s Daughters, Molly and Peggy (1760)